Locating Funds

There are thousands of funding sources from which to choose, so the best way to proceed is to use existing databases on funding agencies. You will find excellent lists of these sources below. Take particular note of the IRIS funding database, and the Grant Advisor as general introductions. But you will also find a full list of sources under several headings.

If it's sabbatical leave support that you need, connect with the Middlebury College listing, which is also at our website. Middlebury have put together an excellent list of such funding, so while navigating their website, go to 'Leave Funding Sources.' Of course, many colleges and universities have such lists.

But fundamentally, to start your quest for research funds, you should be considering the discipline you work in, first and foremost. You should already be fully aware of the major funding agencies in your discipline, the sources of the funding that supported you as a graduate student, and the most likely sources of further funding. Your mentors and senior professors will be helpful not only in reminding you of the name of these agencies, but supplying advice and models for your own research enterprises. The most ideal situation is to start your career by developing a proposal close to those you have experienced in research environments in the past. Develop a cadre of expert helpers, including your peers and supporters in the field. Make sure they read your material carefully, and keep you apprised of new developments in the field and with the funding agencies. And, finally, you should be keeping a regular eye on the research journals, as well as the websites of the major funding agencies. Together, these resources will ensure you make a good fist of your research application.

Funding Resource List

Common Government Funding Sources

Common Non-Government Funding Sources

Other Government and Non-Government Funding Sources

Funding Resource Compilations