Economics: Course Descriptions

ECON-101 Economics of Social Issues

 

Students will develop an understanding of core macroeconomic principles and their application to current problems and issues faced by policymakers. The course will emphasize the macroeconomic policy challenges faced by governments and central banks and describe the various tools available to meet these challenges. The course will examine alternative macroeconomic models used to characterize long-term trends and short-term fluctuations in key economic indicators such as gross domestic product, unemployment, inflation, consumer confidence, and deficits. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

ECON-102 Economics of Markets & Governments

 

An introduction to the basic microeconomic analysis of choice in market based economies shaped by government policy. The course emphasizes the decisions made by individuals, firms, and governments faced with scarce resources. The course examines the limitations of markets in dealing with issues such as income inequality, unsustainable resource use, and anti-competitive firm practices. The course examines the role played by federal, state, and local governments in improving market outcomes. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

ECON-155 Special Topics

 

See department for course description.
Credits: 1.00

ECON-255 Special Topics

 

See department for course description.
Credits: 1.00

ECON-275 Internship

 

See department for details. Internship contract required.
Credits: 1.00

ECON-321 Introduction to Econometrics

 

This course is concerned with the use of statistical methods for estimating and testing economic relationships. The course will emphasize the application of classical statistical techniques of estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis to economic models. Exploration of problems arising from violations of the classical assumptions. The course incorporates extensive use of statistical software to perform data analysis, regression, and forecasting. Prerequisite: ECON 101, ECON 102, and MATH 125. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

ECON-327 Economics Consumers Producers Govrnments

 

This course presents rational choice and behavioral economic models of analyzing individual choice in the presence of scarcity. The understanding of firms begins with the study of production technology and costs and proceeds to the study of firm conduct in different market settings. Throughout the course, students study of the economic efficiency of market outcomes and the effect of government policy on social goals relating to efficiency and equity. Great emphasis will be placed on the use of mathematical tools to study economic outcomes. Prerequisite: ECON 101, ECON 102, and MATH 125. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

ECON-328 Macroecon Found Govt/Cntrl Bank Policy

 

Students will gain an understanding of the origins and distinguishing characteristics of alternative schools of thought in macroeconomics. Development of closed and open economy macroeconomic models used to characterize long-term trends and short-term fluctuations in gross domestic product, unemployment, inflation, and government and international deficits. Application of quantitative methods to analyze relationships among key economic indicators, examination of current economic policy challenges, and prediction of policy outcomes based on competing macroeconomic theories. Prerequisite: ECON 101, ECON 102, and MATH 125. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

ECON-329 International Economics

 

International economics studies the globalization of trade in goods and services markets as well as in markets for financial assets. Students will examine the motivations for trade and the effects of trade on the level and distribution of income and wealth in national economies. During the course of the semester, students will also analyze various policies to impede or promote trade, the function of foreign currency markets, and the causes of international financial crises. Prerequisite: ECON 101 and ECON 102. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

ECON-331 Money and Banking

 

Analysis of the nature and functions of money and effects of changes in the money supply; operation of commercial banks, the Federal Reserve System, and the Treasury that affect the United States' monetary system; monetary theory; critique of various monetary policies. Prerequisite: ECON 101. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

ECON-332 Industry Studies

 

Students apply basic economic principles to the study of the structure, conduct, and performance of local firms and industries. Students also examine the influence of public policy on local firms and industries. Field visits to local firms and presentations by local business managers and government officials comprise much of the course. Prerequisite: ECON 102. 2 credits.
Credits: 2.00

ECON-333 Environmental Economics

 

Environmental economics studies the role in the economic system of environmental amenities such as clean air and clear water. The course analyzes the problems of market outcomes when such amenities are not priced. The problems associated with estimating economic costs and benefits are also carefully examined. The course emphasizes the connection between economic understanding and improved public policy. Also listed as ENV 333. Prerequisite: ECON 102. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

ECON-334 Health Economics

 

Students in the health economics course will apply economic theory and empirical analysis to study how socioeconomic status, public policy actions, and individual decisions influence health outcomes. The economics of private insurance markets comprises another important area of study in the course. The functions and outcomes in the United States health care system will be studied in detail and compared with those in other nations. Prerequisite: ECON 102. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

ECON-335 Labor Economics

 

Students of labor economics study the determinants of supply and demand in labor markets that are segmented by regions, occupants, and other characteristics of workers. Students in this course also study the effect of human capital formation, immigration, and demographic change on wages and employment. The effects of government policies ranging from living wage laws of OSHA regulation comprise an important part of the course. Students examine the influence of unions on labor market outcomes as well. Prerequisite: ECON 102. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

ECON-341 International Trade and Development

 

The economic analysis of globalization. International trade topics include the determinants of trade in goods and services and the effect of trade policy on national income level and distribution. Special attention will be paid to examples relevant to U.S.-Europe, U.S.-Japan, and Developed Country-Less Developed Country economic relations. Topics in international development include determinants of growth and the effect of industrial and trade policy on national income levels and distribution. Prerequisite: ECON-101 and ECON-102. Counts toward core requirement: Comparative Cultural or International Perspectives. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

ECON-351 Energy Economics

 

The economics of energy studies the role of energy and energy resources in industrial societies from an economic perspective. Basic economic principles and methods are used to examine problems in the production, distribution and use of energy in all its important forms including coal, oil, gas, nuclear, electricity, and various alternative fuels. Special policy issues such as the environmental problems of energy use, regulation, the depletion of energy resources, and other problems pertaining to the energy industries will be discussed. Also listed as ENV 351. Prerequisite: ECON 102. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

ECON-355 Special Topics

 

See department for course description. Prerequisite: ECON 102 with a minimum grade of C-.
Credits: 1.00

ECON-395 Independent Study

 

See department for details. Independent study contract required.
Credits: 1.00

ECON-452 Global Finance

 

Global Finance presents the corporate uses of global financial markets. Combining practical knowledge, up-to-date theories, and real-world applications, this course explores issues of currencies, foreign exchange, VaR, funds, and risk management. Also listed as BA 452. Prerequisite: BA 305 with a minimum grade of C- or ECON 331 with a minimum grade of C-. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

ECON-475 Internship

 

See department for details. Internship contract required.
Credits: 0.00

ECON-485 Research Methods in Economics

 

Students will familiarize themselves with the methodology by which economists conduct research, with an emphasis on the development of an effective research question and strategies for identifying relevant scholarly literature. Students will learn how to read theoretical and empirical research papers that contain mathematical expositions beyond the econometric and mathematical training of the typical undergraduate student majoring in economics. The course will also provide students with an understanding of where and how to collect data used in economic analysis, and the limitations that the use of data imposes on economic inference. Students will apply their increased understanding of economic research methodology to produce their own literature review. Prerequisite: ECON 321, ECON 327, and ECON 328. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

ECON-495 Senior Thesis

 

Students work in consultation with their primary advisor to carry out the research plan developed in the Fall. Students present the results of their research to peers and faculty then revise their theses to address the critical feedback they receive. Prerequisite: ECON 485 or ECON 490 and declared Economics major. 2 credits.
Credits: 2.00