Sociology Course Descriptions

SOC-101 Introduction to Sociology

Provides an intensive introduction to human behavior in groups including a study of family, education, religion, government, ecology, deviancy. Basic concepts and terminology are emphasized. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

SOC-102 Social Problems

Study of the nature, scope, causes, effects, alternatives and solutions to the major problems in society, such as poverty, crime, and health. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

SOC-208 Race: Inequality and Identity

In this course you will learn how race is a social fabrication that predicts individuals' life chances and forms understandings of the self. This course offers sociological perspectives on the process of racial identity formation ranging from the impersonal level of bureaucratic structure to the intimate experience of feeling race in everyday life. Equal emphasis will be placed on describing and explaining contemporary forms of racial inequality in the United States. Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-102 or ANTH-101. Counts toward core requirement: Comparative Cultural or Diverse Perspectives. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

SOC-217 Gender & Sexuality

An introduction to the theories and methods used by sociologists to study masculinity and femininity, the social and historical construction of sexuality, love, and romance. Discussion includes the sociology of homosexuality, bisexuality, and heterosexuality, as well as issues of HIV/AIDS, teen pregnancy, prostitution, pornography, sexual harassment and rape in the United States. Also listed as GSS 217. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or SOC 102. Must be 18 years of age. Counts toward core requirement: Diverse Perspectives. Biennially. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

SOC-255 Special Topics

See department for course description.
Credits: 1.00

SOC-266 Deviance

An analysis of definitions of deviance, causes of deviance, and societal reaction to deviance. The relationship between deviant behavior and social justice will be explored. Topics include drug use, mental disorder, the sex industry, suicide, sexual preference, crime and corporate crime. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or SOC 102. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

SOC-275 Internship

See department for details. Internship contract required.
Credits: 1.00

SOC-300 Introduction to Social Research

Analysis and application of the logic and methods of science in sociology is studied. The student learns by doing a research project that goes through all stages: theory, hypothesis, operationalization, research design, population/ sampling, data collection, and analysis. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or SOC 102. Biennially. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

SOC-301 Social Statistics

Introductory statistics course for students in the social sciences. The emphasis of the course will be on understanding how social scientists use numerical data to understand social phenomena, and how to use and interpret statistical measures and techniques commonly reported in the social sciences literature. Prerequisite: MATH 122. Does not meet Social Sciences core requirement (2010 catalog). 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

SOC-304 Criminology

This course is a general introduction to the social science known as criminology. This discipline, largely a composite of anthropology, psychology, and sociology, places particular focus on the phenomenon of crime in society. Examples of questions criminologists ask are: What defines crime? Who are the ones that commit crime and for what reasons? What are some of the established patterns of criminal behavior we see over time? And, what are some mechanisms society uses to regulate, punish or control crime? Because this course is taught from a sociological angle, particular emphasis will be placed upon viewing crime as a societal phenomenon, that is, one that can be analyzed within a broader social context. Prerequisite: ANTH 101, SOC 101 or SOC 102. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

SOC-305 Racism & Ethnicity in Hawaii

This course focuses on the creation of race, ethnicity, and racism in Hawaii and examines how these concepts affect the culture, social structure, and social institutions in Hawaii. The course focuses on the historical and contemporary experiences of native Hawaii and other Asian/Pacific Islander ethnic groups that comprise Hawaii's population. The course will include discussions about native Hawaiian culture, the colonization of Hawaii, the ethnic structure that was further developed in Hawaii during Hawaii's plantation era, and how these complex histories inform and affect the current ethnic social structures and practices (e.g. education, politics, criminal justice system, ethnic humor, etc.) that exist in Hawaii. Overall, the course will expose students to the lived experiences of the various ethnic groups that constitute Hawaii's population and provide students with an understanding of how Hawaii's unique history affects the life chances of the different ethnic groups in Hawaii. It will also prepare students for a travel course (SOC 318) that provides students with first-hand experiences of race and ethnicity in Hawaii. When offered for 4 credits, topics will be explored in more depth. Prerequisite: SOC 101, SOC 102, ANTH 101, ANTH 140, or REL 140. SOC 208 recommended. Counts toward core requirement: Diverse Perspectives. 2 or 4 credits.
Credits: 2.00

SOC-309 Families

The primary emphasis is on the relationship between the familial institution and the society in which it is being studied. Attention is given to trans-historical and cross-cultural data and how social change impacts the institution. Additional areas of investigation include definitions of the family, socialization, cohabitation, courtship, marriage, divorce, gender and sex roles, sexuality, socio-economic forces, family violence, alternative forms, and the future of the family. Also listed as GSS 309. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or SOC 102. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

SOC-312 Social Interaction

A study of the interaction process as the central element in human social life, the primary occasion for communication, and the origin of both social structure and the individual human identity. Attention is given to symbolic communication, interaction, socialization, role theory, self- concept, deviance. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits) and 8 credits of SOC - 4 of the 8 may be taken in ANTH. Biennially. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

SOC-313 Sociology of Religion

A sociological analysis of religious belief, ritual, experience, and organization. Issues to be considered include the social origins of religion, its significance as a social force and as a form of social control, and the relation between religious institutions and the larger society of which they are a part. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits) and 8 credits of SOC - 4 of the 8 may be in ANTH. Biennially. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

SOC-317 Sociology of Popular Culture

This course gives a sociological look at the relationship between the many forms of popular culture and social life. What does the term "popular culture" really mean and what implications does it have for our lives? This course will attempt to answer this question through the exploration of four themes. First, we will explore the concept of popular culture and apply it to domestic and international audiences. Second, we will explore many facets of the concepts of high and low culture, highlighting the cultural, economic, and geopolitical aspects of these "modern" phenomena. Third, we will examine how the grammar of television, music, and film can have multiple social, political, and economic effects. Fourth, as popular culture today is truly a global phenomenon, we will explore some of the most relevant issues as they pertain to the international consumption of art, film, music, and reading materials. Also listed as ANTH 317. Prerequisite: ANTH 101, SOC 101, or SOC 102. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

SOC-318 Racism & Ethnicity Hawaii-Travel

This course allows students to examine the racial and ethnic politics in Hawaii, a state that many believe is a melting pot, where all racial and ethnic groups live harmoniously. The course allows students to see firsthand the consequences of socially constructing race and ethnicity, the colonization of Hawaii, the plantation era in Hawaii, and the continued racial and ethnic politics that marginalize various groups in Hawaii. Students enrolled in this course will visit historical sites in Hawaii to better understand the how the racial and ethnic structure in Hawaii was created. Students will have the opportunity to engage in discussions with scholars, who specialize in the area of racial and ethnic relations in Hawaii, as well as community activists, whose activism responds to the racial and ethnic hierarchy that exists in Hawaii. Students will also complete a research project, while in Hawaii, which will allows them to better understand the everyday lived racial and ethnic experiences of individuals in Hawaii. Overall, this course provides students with firsthand experiences of how the racial and ethnic hierarchy in Hawaii shapes the life chances of individuals living in Hawaii. Prerequisite: SOC 305. Counts toward core requirement: Diverse Perspectives. 2 credits.
Credits: 2.00

SOC-319 Sociology of Medicine

The course analyzes the social and demographic variables affecting health, morbidity, and the mortality rates. It also examines the social roles in illness (e.g., doctor and patient): their definitions and consequences. Attention is given to the study of medical care institutions and their systems and structures. The relations between social policy and health is debated. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or SOC 102. Biennially. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

SOC-321 Sociology of the City

An exploration of the modern United States city. We will use Portland as a "laboratory" for understanding the evolution of cities, how modern cities "work," the problems and successes of urban areas. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or SOC 102. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

SOC-323 Junior Seminar

Students will practice reading and evaluating primary research works in progress. Attention will be given to articulating the research process and to preparing students for their own independent research projects. Students will be instructed in pathways beyond Pacific; for example, how to find and apply to graduate programs, develop a resume, and set up a job-shadowing experience. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits) and declared Sociology, Anthropology-Sociology, or Social Work major or minor. Pass/No Pass. 2 credits.
Credits: 2.00

SOC-342 Consumer Society

This course will explore consumption as a locus of social reproduction and source of meaning in people's lives. Consumer culture plays an increasingly important part in defining who we are, how we live, and how we participate in society. Our daily consumer choices shape our sense of identity and our relationship to the larger society. We will explore some of the far-reaching consequences of a consumer society by looking at education, leisure, bodies and sexuality, homes, community, and the environment. Prerequisite: SOC 101, SOC 102, ANTH 101, or ANTH 140. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

SOC-344 Preparation for Culinary Travel

This course explores the relationship between cuisine and culture with an emphasis on cultures outside the United States. Students complete a series of orientation sessions as well as a full semester of class work. Students read a collection of essays that will prepare the student to tour a particular food and wine producing area and to connect local and regional cultures with food preparation and cuisine. Specific travel destinations and focus of the course will vary from year to year. Course may not be repeated for credit, even when travel destination varies. Also listed as ANTH 344. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits) and 4 credits from ANTH or SOC at 200-level or above. Appropriate language classes are encouraged. IS 201 is encouraged. Instructor's consent is required. Counts toward core requirement: International Perspectives core requirement. 2 credits.
Credits: 2.00

SOC-345 Culinary Travel

This travel course explores the relationship between cuisine and culture. Students tour a variety of food and wine producing areas and connect local and regional cultures with food preparation and cuisine. Specific travel destination will vary from year to year. Course may not be repeated for credit, even when travel destination varies. Also listed as ANTH 345. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above, 4 credits from ANTH or SOC at 200-level or above. Appropriate language classes are encouraged. IS-201 is encouraged. Instructor's consent required. Counts toward core requirement: International Perspectives. 2 credits.
Credits: 2.00

SOC-347 Global Cap Neo-Colonial Inequalities

This course explores how global dimensions of capitalism intersect with local cultural identities and practices. Students will learn how transnational markets, global lending institutions, and transnational governments both shape and are shaped by questions of national identity, gender norms, racial categories, environmental policies and sexual practices. This course introduces students to perspectives on the meaning and scope of "globalization" from early industrialization to the current post-industrial economy. We will explore the typography of economic inequality on the global scale and examine specific examples of how it is maintained and resisted. The course includes post-colonial critiques that draw attention to how race, nationalism, gender and sexuality are central to the process of constructing, maintaining and resisting imperial domination. Also listed as PSJ 347. Prerequisite: ANTH 101, SOC 101, or SOC 102. Counts toward core requirement: International Perspectives. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

SOC-355 Special Topics

See department for course description.
Credits: 1.00

SOC-356 Culture, Cuisine and Class

Explores people's relationship to food with regard to the environment, gender, class structure and the increasing globalization and homogenization of food. Of particular importance are the cultural influences on cuisine as food plays a social, symbolic and political-economic role across cultures. Also listed as ANTH 356. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits). 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

SOC-360 Critical Race Theory

This course focuses on the Critical Race Theory (CRT), which is a multidisciplinary approach to the study of race and ethnic relations. One of the main goals of CRT is to question the dominant paradigm/ideology about race and reconstruct our perceptions of race through counternarratives told by marginalized and oppressed groups. Therefore, this course will expose students to counternarratives that marginalized and oppressed groups tell through class discussions, guest speakers, and course readings. Another important tenet of CRT is to examine the institution and structure of racism through a perspective that stresses intersectionality, and, therefore, the course will not only examine racial issues, but will also examine how these issues affect and are affected by other forms of oppressions, such as sexism, heterosexism, elitism, etc.Upon completing the course students should have a keen awareness of how oppressions (racism, sexism, eltism, heterosexism, etc.) intersect in societal structures. Prerequisite: SOC 101, SOC 102, ANTH 101, ANTH 140 or REL 140. SOC 208 or SOC 305 recommended. Counts toward core requirement: Diverse Perspectives. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

SOC-395 Independent Study

See department for details. Independent study contract required.
Credits: 1.00

SOC-414 Sociological Theory

The origin and development of sociology are analyzed through the examination of major historical theorists and of contemporary schools of sociological thought. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits) and 8 credits in SOC. Biennially. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

SOC-450 Directed Research in Sociology

Directed Research in Sociology allows students of advanced standing to participate in a research project with an sociology faculty member in order to gain practical experience in the conduct of ongoing professional-level sociological research. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits). Instructor's consent required. May be repeated for credit, up to 6 credits total. 1-4 credits.
Credits: 1.00

SOC-455 Special Topics

See department for course description.
Credits: 1.00

SOC-475 Internship

See department for details. Internship contract required.
Credits: 1.00

SOC-490 Advanced Research Methods

This course advances students' understanding of research methods introduced in SOC 300. This course focuses on how to write a research proposal in the social sciences, ethics in social research, and institutional review board requirements. Students will receive advanced training in crafting compelling sociological research questions, writing effective literature reviews, proposing appropriate techniques for empirical research, an performing a feasibility study. Prerequisite: SOC 300. 4 credits.
Credits: 4.00

SOC-494 Senior Thesis I

The focus is to assist students in selecting an area of interest from which to draw an independent research project, to do an initial literature review, to develop a theoretical framework, and to develop a research methodology for the senior research project. Prerequisite: 16 credits of SOC, including SOC 300 and SOC 301. 2 credits.
Credits: 2.00

SOC-495 Senior Thesis II

Student-conducted individual research/theoretical project. Special topics in sociology taught periodically at faculty discretion. Prerequisite: SOC 494. 2 credits.
Credits: 2.00