Part III: Evidence for Meeting Each Standard

Standard One: Candidate Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions

Candidates know and demonstrate the content, pedagogical and professional knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary to help all students learn. Assessments indicate that candidates meet professional, state, and institutional standards.

Element Six: Dispositions for All Candidates

During the orientation at the beginning of each program, candidates are introduced to the program expectations for appropriate professional dispositions and ethical behavior and the Dispositions Assessment Form. In this element, the following components are used to provide evidence of high standards of candidate dispositions: (a) Results of the use of the Dispositions Assessment Form, and (b) Student teaching evaluations.

A. Dispositions for All Candidates

The Dispositions Action Formpdf, Dispositions Faculty Evaluationpdf, Candidate Disposition Self-Assessmentpdf and Dispositions Procedurespdf provide the basis for the assessment of dispositions for all candidates (MAT, UG, and AP). These tools have been developed and implemented over the last two years. They are tied closely with the conceptual framework and represent the values and attitudes that the faculty consider important to success in the profession. Sources included specialty area professional guidelines and codes of ethics (e.g. Council on Exceptional Children, TSPC The Ethical Educator). Other references include: Mack, C.L, Samek, L., Webber-Davis, Y. (2006); Darling-Hammond, L. (2000); and Danielson, C. (1996).

Any time a candidate demonstrates weakness in one or more dispositions area, faculty members submit a Dispositions Form that delineates their concerns. In addition, after the completion of each course, faculty members evaluate each candidate according to the dispositions and submit the Dispositions Form on those who demonstrate problems. The form is then used as a basis for discussion between the instructor and the candidate. To ensure that candidates understand the dispositions, the Disposition Assessment Form is reviewed with candidates at the orientation to the program attended by all admitted candidates. A copy of the form appears in each of the program handbooks that are distributed to all candidates.

Table 1.6.1
Number of Candidates with Disposition Problems Identified by Academic Year

Disposition Problem Category
2006-2007
2005-2006
2004-2005
1. Candidate is working towards cultural competence.
2. Candidate interacts constructively.
1
3
1
3. Candidate is ethical and professional
1
1
4. Candidate is a reflective practitioner.
5. Candidate contributes to the learning community.
1
1

The COE maintains a database that includes (a) demographic information of student name, race, gender, (b) course and semester in which the disposition form indicated difficulties for the candidate, and (c) areas in which dispositional problems were noted. This database is aggregated and shared with the faculty and the Consortium annually.

Since we placed the Dispositions Procedures and Assessment Form in effect, we have been very successful in resolving student issues early in the program. On very rare occasions, we have counseled candidates to forego a teaching career and leave the program. Usually these students opt to finish a degree through our Master of Arts in Education/Curriculum Studies (MAE/CS) non-licensure program. Students have the right to appeal a decision to remove them from a program; however, in instances in which they have appealed, the administrative decision was upheld.

B. Student Teaching Evaluations

The dispositions are also assessed through the student teaching evaluations completed during and at the completion of student teaching. Along with some competencies in other sections, the student teaching evaluations contain one section that rates the extent to which candidates “exhibit professional behaviors, ethics and values.” There are 10 competencies in that section that are to be rated from 1-6 according to the scoring rubric by the candidate, mentor(s) and university supervisor. A candidate must receive a MET for that section in order to be recommended for licensure. In the foundation ITL courses, topics are introduced that are aimed at preparing teachers to be able to teach all students – inclusion and discrimination, NCLB in its many manifestations, and the ethics of education for all.

The mean ratings by the mentors and university supervisors for selected questions of the Student Teacher Summary Evaluations are presented in the table below. Many of these items are closely associated with our Conceptual Framework with a focus on developing cultural competency. Summaries of all of the other student teaching evaluation items can be found in the Master Candidate Database.

Table 1.6.2
Evidence of Professional Behaviors, Ethics and Values During ITL Student Teaching (Mean Score by Program)
(1 = Low; 6 = High)

Competency
The candidate demonstrates the ability to:
MAT/5 FG 6/07
N = 58
MAT/5 Eugene 12/06
N = 48
MAT/Flex FG & Eug 12/06
N = 29
MAT/Flex FG & Eug 6/07
N = 11
UG FG & Eug** 12/06
N = 6
UG FG & Eug 6/07
N = 12
1f) Adapt unit and lesson plans for students with diverse needs, and for students with varying cultural, social, and linguistic backgrounds.
Mentor(s)*
4.39
4.65
4.28
3.73
Met
3.82
University Supervisor
4.26
4.62
4.33
3.82
Met
3.73
2c) Employ equitable practices that are just and that support a least restrictive environment for all students;
Mentor(s)*
4.88
5.12
4.45
4.64
Met
4.36
University Supervisor
4.68
5.06
4.41
4.45
Met
4.18
2g) Interact thoughtfully and courteously with students and their parents and resolve conflicts in a professional manner, respecting the cultural context of the community.
Mentor(s)
4.80
5.24
4.59
4.45
Met
4.36
University Supervisor
4.61
5.14
4.41
4.40
Met
4.00
6d) Be aware of, and act in accordance with, school policies and practices.
Mentor(s)*
5.28
5.42
4.86
4.73
Met
4.73
University Supervisor
5.01
5.40
4.83
4.64
Met
4.45
6f) Interact constructively and respectfully with colleagues, administrators, supervisors, and educational assistants and parents.
Mentor(s)
5.27
5.56
4.90
4.64
Met
4.64
University Supervisor
5.10
5.40
4.74
4.55
Met
4.36
6g) Collaborate with parents, colleagues, and members of the community to provide internal and external assistance to students and their families to promote student learning.
Mentor(s)
---------
5.09
4.62 n=18
4.27 Eu only
---------
---------
University Supervisor
---------
5.05
4.52 n=18
4.27 Eu only
---------
---------

*If the candidate had more than one mentor, the ratings are averaged.
**Due to an instrument modification, this program’s candidates were only scored Met/Not Met.

Advanced Programs

Special Education

Similar to the candidates in the Initial Teaching License programs (MAT/5th; MAT/Flex; BA/BS) the MAT Special Education candidates (MAT/SpEd; Special Education Endorsement) must show competency in demonstrating the dispositions needed to be successful teachers. The same process is used to track those who are having difficulties and intervening when problems arise. Due to the unique nature of the internship program the Teacher Education Associates are often the first ones to alert COE faculty members and the Special Education Program Coordinator of disposition problems. Table 1.6.3 presents the aggregated professional judgments made by TEAs concerning candidates’ professional behavior, ethics, and values.

Table 1.6.3
Evidence of Professional Behaviors, Ethics and Values During Special Education Internships
 (Mean Score by Program)

Competency
The candidate demonstrates the ability to:
SpEd FG 8/06**
N=35
SpEd Eugene 8/06**
N=22
SpEd FG 8/07
N=30
SpEd Eugene 8/07**
N=21
1f) Adapt unit and lesson plans for students with diverse needs, and for students with varying cultural, social, and linguistic backgrounds.
Mentor(s)*
– *
– *
4.60
– *
University Supervisor
– *
– *
4.57
– *
2c) Employ equitable practices that are just and that support a least restrictive environment for all students;
Mentor(s)*
Met
Met
5.12
Met
University Supervisor
Met
Met
4.96
Met
2g) Interact thoughtfully and courteously with students and their parents and resolve conflicts in a professional manner, respecting the cultural context of the community.
Mentor(s)
– *
– *
4.95
– *
University Supervisor
– *
– *
4.93
– *
6d) Be aware of, and act in accordance with, school policies and practices.
Mentor(s)*
Met
Met
4.95
Met
University Supervisor
Met
Met
4.89
Met
6f) Interact constructively and respectfully with colleagues, administrators, supervisors, and educational assistants and parents.
Mentor(s)
Met
Met
4.89
Met
University Supervisor
Met
Met
5.04
Met

*Due to changes in assessment instruments, some items were scored Met/Not Met only, and some were not scored at all.