Part III: Evidence for Meeting Each Standard

Standard Six: Unit Governance and Resources

The unit has the leadership authority, budget, personnel, facilities, and resources including information technology resources, for the preparation of candidates to meet professional, state, and institutional standards.

Element Two: Unit Budget

During the past ten years the COE revenue has increased from $1,702,756 in 1996-97 to $6,231,167 in 2005-06. This 370% increase in revenue can be attributed to steady growth in the MAT 5th year program at both campuses and the development of the MAT Flex and APT Special Education programs at both campuses. Though not as dramatic, the growth during the past five years shows a 139% increase or an average of 27.8% a year. One of the challenges for the College of Education however is that during this same five-year period the funds released for direct support of the College of Education has only increased 6.6% for the entire 5 year period. Or put another way, in 1997-98 for every dollar earned 55.92 cents was used for direct support of the COE while in 2005-06 only 47.5 cents was used for that purpose. Table 6.2.1 shows the direct to indirect percentages over the past nine years:

Table 6.2.1
Ratio of COE Revenue for Direct COE and Indirect University Support

% of COE Revenue Assigned to Direct COE Support and % Available for Indirect Support and Pacific University General Use
 
1997-98
1998-99
1999-00
2000-01
2001-02
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
Direct
55.92%
61.20%
58.82%
74.92%
63.99%
65.30%
55.61%
51.21%
47.48%
General
44.08%
38.80%
41.18%
25.08%
36.01%
34.70%
44.39%
48.79%
52.52%

The decline in the percentage of direct support for COE programs has made it more challenging to support COE efforts to increase program quality out of annual revenue, particularly the ability to increase support for student scholarships, faculty and staff development, and the COE strategic plan initiatives. The dean is creating plans to solicit long-term investors in the COE in order to ensure that these initiatives are well supported during the next ten years. Though the direct support percentage for the COE expenditures has decreased in relation to revenue the amount of investment in COE infrastructure has increased dramatically with the building of Berglund Hall on the Forest Grove campus.

Even within these budgetary changes the COE has been able to make certain that COE faculty are regularly involved in teaching, scholarship, and service at a level consistent with other graduate and professional programs at the university.

Table 6.2.2
Revenues/Expenses for Pacific University Graduate and Professional Programs

Revenues and Expenses for Graduate and Professional Programs 2003 - 2007
Program/
Year
Professional Psychology
Occupational Therapy
Physical
Therapy
Education
Physician
Assistant
Optometry
2003/04
Revenues
Expenses
Net

3,803,160
2,478,330
1,324,830

799,494
663,437
136,057

2,194,867
1,211,274
986,593

4,610,675
2,824,304
1,786,371

1,777,090
1,069,304
707,786

10,485,322
6,092,815
3,582,507
2004/05
Revenues
Expenses
Net

4,347,642
2,711,659
1,635,983

1,077,802
717,193
360,609

2,389,051
1,230,139
1,158,912

4,864,852
3,056,886
1,807,966

1,953,320
1,155,527
797,783

10,502,464
6,135,804
4,366,660
2005/06
Revenues
Expenses
Net

4,756,215
2,881,103
1,875,112

1,171,078
729,144
441,934

2,432,429
1,279,653
1,152,776

5,402,320
2,980,736
2,421,584

2,151,770
1,200,080
951,690

11,087,142
6,530,832
4,556,310
2006-07
Revenues/
Expenses
Net

5,677,692
3,357,262
2,230,430

1,408,827
696,521
712,306

2,657,512
1,294,413
1,363,099

5,717,467
3,165,206
2,552,261

2,219,448
1,226,141
983,307

11,434,118
6,697,054
4,737,064

The data in Table 6.2.2 above gives a historical view of the total revenue generated by long-standing graduate programs on the Pacific University campus along with the accompanying budget given to the programs and colleges to operate those programs. With this data it is difficult to determine how the College of Education is supported in relation to the other graduate programs. Thus, Table 6.2.3 compares the revenue and resources for each of the graduate programs that were fully operating in 2006-07 to the total graduate revenue and resources for that year. As you can see, four graduate programs receive a negative percentage of budgeted operating funds in relation to total revenue with the College of Education receiving the lowest. Even then, the margin is only 3.18% difference between the highest (Optometry) and the lowest (Education). The dean continues to focus his efforts on finding multiple sources of resources to operate high-quality programs.

Table 6.2.3
Comparison of Budget Ratios Among Pacific University Graduate Programs 2006-07

Program
AVG FTE
Revenue
Avg. Rev per FTE
Budget
Avg. Budget per FTE
Ratio Budget to Revenue
% 0f Total Revenue
% 0f Total Budget
% over or under in relation to total revenue
College of Education
287
$6,042,467
$21,054
$3,165,206
$11,029
0.5238
20.52%
19.26%
-1.27%
College of Optometry
362
$11,434,118
$31,586
$6,697,054
$18,500
0.5857
38.84%
40.74%
1.91%
Occupational Therapy
65
$1,408,827
$21,674
$696,521
$10,716
0.4943
4.79%
4.24%
-0.55%
Physician Assistants
83
$2,219,468
$26,741
$1,226,141
$14,773
0.5524
7.54%
7.46%
-0.08%
Physical Therapy
120
$2,657,512
$22,146
$1,294,413
$10,787
0.4870
9.03%
7.88%
-1.15%
Professional Psychology
275
$5,677,692
$20,646
$3,357,262
$12,208
0.5913
19.29%
20.43%
1.14%
$29,440,084
$16,436,597
Note: COE includes $325,000 of revenue from traditional undergraduate students

In fulfilling its mission to “transform education through communities of learners” the College of Education actively reaches out to its surrounding communities. Through the Lane County Pathways to Teaching Program developed in November 2005, the Eugene campus has partnered with local school districts, colleges, and universities to establish a program whereby bilingual/bicultural candidates receive financial help to become a teacher. Currently, $10,000 a year is allocated to this program.

One of our primary goals is to be known as the university where diverse candidates can successfully become teachers. As a result, the COE faculty and alumni established the Touch the Future program in 2001 to foster the development of highly qualified teachers of color. The program introduces middle and high school students of color to university life and to the profession of teaching by bringing them to campus one day a year. Over the years students from the Lane, Multnomah, Marion, and Washington county public schools have attended Touch the Future events at both the Forest Grove and Eugene campuses. We are actively raising endowments for scholarships to be able to help these students attend Pacific University.

Faculty members are actively involved in state-wide in-service workshops on diversity and cross-cultural communication, computer-based study strategies, teaching reading in the content area, and approaches for working with the moderate/severe population in special education. Many Pacific University faculty members model strong community service through participation on state advisory committees and local school boards of education, as well as serving as consultants in support of faculty development and academic programs including diversity, curriculum, special needs, and technology. All COE programs encompass a strong field-based component that encourages active school and classroom involvement by university supervisors, often resulting in consulting, volunteer work, and support activities. In addition, many COE faculty members are active in their local school districts, serving in such roles as webmaster for the PTA, volunteer SMART reader, and fund raising in order to hire additional teachers. Two COE faculty members started a New Teacher Academy in 2005 to support COE graduates hired in the Washington County school districts. Further, the COE has financially supported one faculty member to be involved as a scholar in the Prime Time Reading program designed for literacy among Hispanic adults.

The Forest Grove COE faculty partnered with the local school district in spring 2007 to offer a writing workshop for P-12 students on campus. This was well received by the P-12 students. In putting on this workshop, faculty members in the College of Arts and Sciences got involved in teaching some of the workshops. One of these faculty members is recruiting her writing/literature majors to get involved in future events.

All initial teaching license programs rely on strong partnerships with school districts where we place student teachers. The budget supports this partnership by paying mentor teachers $150-$350 depending upon location and the nature of the practicum. The Assistant Dean on each campus regularly schedules mentor teacher workshops to ensure quality connections between the COE and the districts. Mentor teachers are paid a $50 stipend for attending these workshops. Finally, the COE issues credit vouchers directly to mentor teachers that can be used by the mentors for their own professional development. Mentors earn three or four one-credit vouchers per an extended period of mentoring a student teacher.

The COE Alumni Council hosts Student Teacher/Alumni Receptions (STAR) that provide student teachers with the opportunity to obtain advice from alumni on successful first year teaching techniques and job hunting.