Conference Presentation Guidelines

Includes: Multimedia presentations (e.g. PowerPoint) or digital copies of analog images created by faculty or students; presentations or images may have been originally created for instructional activities, or may have been created specifically for a peer conference presentation (occurring at non-commercial conferences, workshops or seminars)

Option One: Determine if the material is in the public domain or is licensed for open use. If not…
Option Two: Determine if the use qualifies as fair use. If not…
Option Three: Get permission to use the material from the copyright holder.

Safe Use

Portion Limitations:

Multimedia Presentations

  1. Motion Media: Up to 10 percent or 3 minutes of a work, whichever is less.
  2. Text Material: Up to 10 percent or 1,000 words, whichever is less.
  3. Music, Lyrics, and Music Video: Up to 10 percent, but no more than 30 seconds.
  4. Illustrations and Photographs: No more than 5 images by an artist or photographer. When using material from a published collective work, no more than 10 percent or 15 images, whichever is less.
  5. Numerical Data Sets: Up to 10 percent or 2500 fields or cell entries, whichever is less.

Digital Copies of Analog Images

  1. Portion of Image: Entire images may be digitized
  2. Same Artist/Photographer/Creator: Digitize no more than 5 images by an artist or photographer
  3. Collective Works: When digitizing material from a published collective work, copy no more than 10 percent or 15 images, whichever is less.

Time Limitations:

Multimedia Presentations

  • Faculty may use their educational multimedia projects for a period of up to two years after the first use at a conference or in a classroom.
  • Students may use their multimedia projects at the conference, or in the class, for which they were created and in their own portfolios as examples of academic work for job/graduate school interviews

Digital Copies of Analog Images

  • Images should only be digitized without first seeking permission if there is not reasonably adequate time available to obtain clearance.
  • Images should not be digitized for the purpose of systematic use (repeated use by the same person or for the same purpose) without seeking permission.

Access/Distribution Limitations:

Multimedia Presentations

  • There may be no more than two copies made of an educator’s multimedia project. If digital copies of a presentation are to be widely distributed or otherwise made accessible online, permission should be sought for use of included copyrighted content.

Digital Copies of Analog Images

  • Faculty or students may display digitized images for the purpose of their presentation. If digital copies of a presentation are to be widely distributed or otherwise made accessible online, permission should be sought for use of digitized images.
  • Digitized images should not be added to a shared image collection.

Other Limitations:

Digital Copies of Analog Images

  • A copyright notice should be visibly affixed to the image.

  • If a digital copy of the image already exists, and is available to purchase or license at a reasonable price, do not digitize the image.

Questionable Use

For possible uses of copyrighted materials that exceed the portion, time and access/distribution limitations outlined above, please do the following:

Dangerous Use

Portion:

Multimedia Presentations

  1. Motion Media: Embedding an entire film into a presentation.
  2. Text Material: Copying blocks of text that are thousands of words long from one source.
  3. Music, Lyrics, and Music Video: Embedding an entire song or music video into a presentation.
  4. Illustrations and Photographs: Using more than 5 images from one artist or photographer or, when using material from a published collective work, using more than 10 percent or 15 images.
  5. Numerical Data Sets: Embedding entire data sets into a presentation.

Digital Copies of Analog Images

  1. Portion of Image: Not applicable.
  2. Same Artist/Photographer/Creator: Digitizing dozens of images by the same artist/photographer/creator.
  3. Collective Works: Digitizing substantially more than 10 percent of the images from a collected work.

Time:

Multimedia Presentations

  • Faculty using the same multimedia presentation for more than two or three years, without changing the copyrighted content.
  • Students using their multimedia presentations after graduating for purposes other than job or graduate school portfolios.

Digital Copies of Analog Images

  • Digitizing images well in advance of a need without seeking permission.
  • Digitizing images for the purpose of systematic use (e.g. using them for the same course repeatedly) without seeking permission.

Access/Distribution:

  • Emailing copies of a presentation to other conference attendees, or posting a digital copy of a presentation to a conference site.
  • Posting a presentation on a personal website.
  • Using a presentation which makes “fair use” of copyrighted materials at a paid speaking engagement.

Digital Copies of Analog Images

  • Students or faculty displaying digitized images on personal websites, blogs, etc. or using such images in material submitted for publication.
  • Emailing copies of images used in a presentation to other conference attendees, or posting images to a conference site.
  • Adding digitized images to a shared departmental image collection without seeking permission.

Other Limitations:

Digital Copies of Analog Images

  • No copyright notice is affixed to the image.
  • A digital copy of the image already exists, and is available to purchase or license at a reasonable price, but it is not purchased/licensed.