Psychology | Clinical Psychology PhD

The PhD Program in Clinical Psychology at Pacific University adheres to a scientist-practitioner model. Students are trained to truly integrate the science and practice of psychology by completing specific requirements in didactic instruction and experiential practica. Graduates are capable of functioning as scientists and practitioners, but are trained with a particular emphasis on the research and academic aspects of psychology.

Additionally, in accordance with competencies outlined by the American Psychological Association as essential for psychologists and the current projections regarding the new and innovative ways in which psychologists will need to practice to meet the needs of our clients and communities in the future, students are trained to evaluate and administer programs and outcomes, to develop innovative interventions, to be competent supervisors and consultants, and to function effectively in integrated healthcare settings. Additionally, although a generalist program, all students receive training in the research and clinical aspects of complementary healthcare, including special training in the research and practice of mindfulness.

Consistent with the scientist-practitioner training model, the program has six primary goals:

  1. To produce competent scientists
  2. To produce competent practitioners who are skilled in using evidence-based clinical practices
  3. To produce clinical psychologists who are skillful in integrating the science and practice elements of clinical psychology into all of their work
  4. To produce clinical psychologists who adhere to the ethical standards of our field
  5. To produce clinical psychologists who are sensitive to cultural diversity
  6. To produce clinical psychologists who have the skills necessary to be successful in the future practice of clinical psychology

In accordance with APA policy, the program is not eligible to apply for accreditation until a sufficient number of students has matriculated at each level of the program, including candidacy status (see the APA Commission on Accreditation website for further details). As soon as the program reaches eligibility to initiate the accreditation process, the program faculty will initiate an application to the American Psychological Association. Pacific University is regionally accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU).

Professor and Associate Director of Clinical Training, Director of Health Psychology Track
Professor, Director of Clinical Training
Assistant Professor, Professional Psychology
Dean, School of Professional Psychology
Associate Professor, MA Program Director
Professor and Director of the Neuropsychology Track
Professor, Director of Organizational Consulting Psychology Track
Associate Professor & Director of the Forensic Track
Professor and Director of Human Diversity
Professor and Director, Child & Adolescent Track
Associate Professor, Director of Research
Professor and Program Director
Professor, Director of Pacific Psychology Clinics 2013/2014
Associate Professor, Professional Psychology

Tamara E. Tasker, PsyD

Associate Professor
Assistant Professor, Director of Latino Billingual Track

Students must accumulate a minimum of 119 credits to graduate and must have completed all required coursework. The following is a typical academic schedule in the clinical psychology PhD program:

Year 1

Fall Credits
GPSY 982 Research Design & Methodology 3
GPSY 921 Clinical Assessment I - Foundations 3
GPSY 902 Self-Care & the Science and Practices of Mindfulness 3
GPSY 725 Basic Clinical Skills 3
GPSY 735 Basic Clinical Skills Lab 1
GPSY 510  
  Total 13.5
Spring Credits
GPSY 980 Advanced Statistics in Psychology I 3
GPSY 922 Clinical Assessment II - Applications 3
GPSY 820 Psychopathology 3
GPSY 813 Social Bases of Behavior 3
GPSY 807 Cognitive/Affective Bases of Behavior 3
  Total 15.5 Credits
Summer Credits
GPSY 870 Ethics & Professional Issues 3
GPSY 920 Thesis 12 
GPSY 722 Evidence-Based Psychotherapy
  Total 9 Credits

Year 2

Fall Credits
GPSY 887 Practicum I 4
GPSY 920 Thesis 12
GPSY 802 Advanced Life Span Psychology 3
GPSY 981 Advanced Statistics in Psychology II 3
GPSY 800 History and Systems 3
  Total 15 Credits
Spring Credits
GPSY 887 Practicum I 4
GPSY 920 Thesis 12
GPSY 940 The Role of Psychologist in Integrated Healthcare 3
GPSY 811 Behavioral Neuroscience 3
  Total 12 Credits
Summer Credits
GPSY 887 Practicum I 4
GPSY 920 Thesis 12
GPSY 814 Human Diversity 3
GPSY 819 Human Diversity Laboratory 1
  Total 13 credits

Year 3

Fall Credits
GPSY 888 Practicum II 4
GPSY 970 Dissertation 18
GPSY 863 Program Evaluation and Administration 3
  Total 9 Credits
Spring Credits
GPSY 888 Practicum II 4
GPSY 970 Dissertation 18
GPSY 951 Neuropsychopharmacology 3
CHP Elective  
  Total 11 Credits
Summer Credits
GPSY 888 Practicum II 4
GPSY 970 Dissertation 18
  Total 6 Credits

Year 4

Fall Credits
GPSY 970 Dissertation 18
GPSY 873 Supervision Practicum 1
  Total 6 Credits
Spring Credits
GPSY 970 Dissertation 18
GPSY 873 Supervision Practicum 1
  Total 6 Credits
Summer Credits
GPSY 970 Dissertation 18
  Total 1 Credit

Year 5

Fall Credits
GPSY 890 Internship 1
  Total 2 Credits
Spring Credits
GPSY 890 Internship 1
  Total 2 Credits
Summer Credits
GPSY 890 Internship 1
  Total 2 Credits

*Please note that students enrolled in the PhD program have a number of potential elective courses to choose from; however, PhD students do not specialize in one of the six tracks outlined for the Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology (PsyD).

Oct. 10, 2014 | The Opioid Puzzle: Best Practices in Healthcare
Date: Friday, October 10, 2014 - 08:30 to 15:00

With the current medical and legislative controversies around use of opioids in chronic pain patients, many providers puzzle to balance appropriately treating pain and increasing quality of life, versus overmedicating or inappropriately medicating patients with disastrous consequences. The Opioid Puzzle: Best Practices in Healthcare workshop clarifies misconceptions around the mechanisms and signs of tolerance, addiction, and dependence, reviews current laws and regulations regarding controlled substance prescribing including the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program and deliberates on how to make the decision to treat with an opioid. After attending this seminar, participants should be able to better understand the mechanism by which opioid addiction occurs, the objective data of opioid use and law in the Pacific Northwest, how to protect their practice while improving patient care, and should be able to inform their clinical decision making by an increased understanding of risk factors and protocols for opioid treatment.
COURSE PRESENTERS |
Amber Buhler, PhD Associate Professor
Michael Millard, RPh, MS Assistant Dean for Clinical Services, Assistant Professor
Andrew Mendenhall, MD Medical Director of Hazelden Beaverton