Humanities

David DeMoss

 

David DeMoss - Website

Professor of Philosophy.

Currently I am preparing for my sabbatical (May 2010-Jan 2011).  My project entitled “The Empty and Extended Self” will explore the ideas of Buddhism in the light of contemporary cognitive science and philosophy. More specifically, I will interpret certain key concepts from Buddhism using the “spread out” or “extended” model of the self adapted from the work of Daniel Dennett and Andy Clark. The Buddhist concepts I plan to investigate are: emptiness (and the related notion of no-self, anatman), suffering (sometimes translated as “anguish,” dukhha), craving, compassion, and social engagement.  I plan to show how these Buddhist concepts should be understood if we assume, along with Andy Clark, that human beings are “thinking and reasoning systems whose minds and selves are spread across biological and nonbiological circuitry” (Clark, Natural-Born Cyborgs, 2003, p.3.)

                                      

                                        

David Boersema

 

David Boersema - Website

Professor of Philosophy

 

Publications


General Editor, Essays in Philosophy

 

Books


Pragmatism and Reference, Cambridge: The MIT Press, 2009
Philosophy of Science, New York: Pearson Prentice-Hall, 2008
Spiritual and Political Dimensions of Nonviolence and Peace, co-editor with Katy Gray Brown, New York: Rodopi, 2006

Articles
“Aristotle” forthcoming in World History Encyclopedia. Ed. Kevin McGeough, ABC-CLIO Publishers, 2009
“Socrates” forthcoming in World History Encyclopedia. Ed. Kevin McGeough, ABC-CLIO Publishers, 2009
“Middle East and North America” In The Nineties in America. Ed. Milton Berman. Pasadena: Salem Press, 2009. Pages 568-571
“What’s Wrong with Victims’ Rights?” forthcoming in Remembrance and Reconciliation. Eds. Dennis Rothermel and Ron Hirschbein. Rodopi Publishers, 2009
“Geach on Proper Names” In The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy: Volume 6, Epistemology. Eds. Stephen Voss and Dermot Moran. Ankara: Philosophical Society of Turkey, 2008. Pages 37-42
“Ramsey Sentence” In American Philosophy: An Encyclopedia. Eds. John Lachs and Robert Talisse. New York: Routledge, 2008. Page 645
“Metaphysics” In American Philosophy: An Encyclopedia. Eds. John Lachs and Robert Talisse. New York: Routledge, 2008. Pages 503-506
“Inference” In American Philosophy: An Encyclopedia. Eds. John Lachs and Robert Talisse. New York: Routledge, 2008. Pages 394-395
“Logic: Deduction” In American Philosophy: An Encyclopedia. Eds. John Lachs and Robert Talisse. New York: Routledge, 2008. Pages 471-472
“Epistemology” In American Philosophy: An Encyclopedia. Eds. John Lachs and Robert Talisse. New York: Routledge, 2008. Pages 239-242
“Readers vs. Breeders” The Pantaneto Forum October 2007 (on-line journal; www.pantaneto.co.uk/issue28/boersema)
“Taking Compromise Seriously” In Spiritual and Political Dimensions of Nonviolence and Peace. Eds. David Boersema and Katy Gray Brown. New York: Rodopi, 2006. Pages 161-167
“Moral Explanation” Bridges 13 (2006): 1-29
“Eco on Names and Reference” Contemporary Pragmatism 2.

 

Andrew Dawes

 

Ramona Ilea - Website

Assistant Professor, Philosophy

Research Interests

There is a common conception that philosophy is interesting and deep, but it does not make much of a difference in the real world. This is in part because in the 20th century, philosophers in the Anglo-American, or the analytic, tradition aspired to the objectivity of the sciences; and this aspiration led philosophers to think that they needed to be neutral on controversial social/political issues. My work fits within a growing movement to reverse this trend. I argue that it is possible for philosophical work to contribute to public debates and social issues in ways that do not undermine our roles as philosophers. Furthermore, I aim to show philosophers interested in doing publicly engaged philosophy how to do so in a responsible and effective manner by articulating the methodologies implicit in the work of exemplary engaged philosophers. Through systematic and rigorous thinking about our distinctive roles, skills, and knowledge, philosophers will be better able to make valuable contributions to important social issues. Philosophers' engagement in the world, collaboration with others, and the motivation to search more deeply for new and innovative ideas will enrich and further issues of public concern.

My dissertation, "Moral Arguments and Social Change," was an analysis of philosophy's potential for making an impact in the public domain.

My next project, for which I received a Faculty Development Grant, is to edit and publish a book called Philosophy and Activism.

My publications and conference presentations include: “Nussbaum’s Capabilities Approach and Non-Human Animals: Theory and Public Policy,” “The ‘Mutant’ Cure or Social Change? Debating Disability and the X-Men,” "Hume and Singer on Sympathy," "Publicly Engaged Philosophy," “Intensive Livestock Farming: Global Trends, Increased Environmental Concerns, and Ethical Solutions,” "Biotechnologies of Gender: Coercive or Liberatory?" “The New Green: When Pigs Fly … Off Our Plates,” "Gender Identity Disorder: A Disorder?" "Parmenides' Two Routes of Inquiry: Reassembling the Jigsaw Puzzle," and "Women and Art: Embodiment and Self-Representation."