News, Media and Stories | Alumni

Rachel Seibert smiling working.
Rachel Seibert BSW '12 was called to medical social work — and to Randall Children’s Hospital — by personal experience. At 18, she was in an accident that nearly claimed her life. She was treated at Randall for more than two years by some of the same people who are, today, her colleagues.
Janelle Jones '08, OT '11
Janelle Jones ’11, OT ’14 spends her days helping people find the way to a new life. As an occupational therapist at Oregon State Hospital, Jones works in the state-run psychiatric hospital’s Bridges program. That means she works primarily with individuals who have been found guilty-except-for-insanity in a criminal case and who are now preparing to transition out of a hospital setting.
Malea Johnson DHS '14
Oral health affects the whole body — which is why Malea Johnson DHS ‘14 is integrating dental care with medical care for Colorado’s rural residents.
Young children walking out front of the school house.
A deeply involved member of Pacific University’s Student Religious Council, Fran O’Brien '65 had a fundamental belief in social justice. It was that belief that led her to become the only Pacific University student to participate in the Freedom Summer of 1964.
Charlotte Filer
Bequests provide a lasting legacy at Pacific.
Weberling Smiling
A passion for Pacific earns four new members a place in the President's Circle, honoring the university's $100,000 lifetime donors.
Mad Dog Teaser
At their 30th class reunion in 2003, his classmates honored his efforts by unveiling the Mad Dog Scholarship Fund. The fund reached the endowment level in 2009 and offered its first scholarship to an optometry student in 2010.
Business Students at Commencement
When Sukhmeet Chhabra came to Pacific University, she was seeking a new career in a new field. Pacific’s new Master of Science in Finance Program, she said, offered a quick and convenient route to achieving her goals at a longstanding university with a solid reputation.
Richardson Family
Growing up, Avery Richardson ’17 wasn’t sure his father’s alma mater was even real.

Pages