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AZ Walk on Pacific University's Campus
Some 520 Pacific University students and alumni served in World War II. About 31, roughly equivalent to an entire senior class at the time, never came home.
Private First Class Shin Sato pictured in his uniform
It was spring, 1942 and there was war all over the world. The Great Depression had ended, but now the Allied nations were fighting for their lives as the second European war of the century metastasized with horrific swiftness into global conflict.
Calvin Van pictured with his family.
It had been barely a year since Calvin Van Pelt finished his freshman year at Pacific University when he landed at Utah Beach on D-Day, the great invasion that was the beginning of the liberation of Europe from Nazi domination.
Dr. Lesley Hallick at the podium accepting the presidency.
She’d already been on the job since August 2009, but the inauguaration of Lesley Hallick in March as Pacific’s 17th president formalized the transition with a vintage Pacific ceremony.
Lu'au Dancers performing together on stage.
The first lū‘au at Pacific wasn’t very good, according to Hawai‘i Club co-founder Fred Scheller ’43, MA ’54. Fifty years later, not only is it good, it’s one of the biggest and best outside of the Islands.
Aunty Edna pictured seated at her desk working.
It takes a lot of kŌkuna (cooperation) from parents, students, alumni and friends to stage a Pacific lū‘au—and one special woman to pull it all together.
A small bird nest pictured from above
Jan Shield was walking through the trees on his windswept property on Chehalem Mountain near Newberg, Ore. when he noticed a bird’s nest on the ground. The Pacific art professor had found other nests similarly dislodged and marveled at their structure and materials. Twigs, straw, mud, feathers, twine scavenged by avian architects.
Robin feeding her young in a nest on Pacific University's campus.
Numerous bird species, from the northernmost population of acorn woodpeckers to the common robin, call Pacific’s Forest Grove campus home.
President Hallick pictured with her horse.
New President Lesley Hallick is a molecular biologist, a noted administrator— and proud owner of a mule named Elvis. 

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