45 CFR 46: Protection of Human Subjects (HHS)

45 CFR 46

Individual Develpment Plan Policy

POL-OSSP3201

Grounded in the core theme of educating for student success, Individual Development Plans intend to guide graduate and postdoctoral students in their professional development and career planning.

Graduate students and post-doctoral researchers supported by funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) are required to develop Individual Development Plans (IDP). Required progress reports submitted to the NIH must include a copy of the University’s IDP policy, a description of whether the university uses IDPs, and how IDPs are used to assist in the career development of graduate students and postdoctoral researchers supported by NIH.  

Pacific University encourages graduate students and postdoctoral researchers to create and use IDPs to formulate academic and career goals and facilitate conversations with faculty advisors and mentors. All graduate students and postdoctoral researchers supported by NIH funding are required to have an IDP. The Office of Scholarship and Sponsored Projects offers graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, faculty advisors and mentors information on IDP resources, including templates and online resources.

PUNet ID required to review policy.

Dec. 18, 2018

Institutional Review Board Policies & Procedures

The policies and procedures of the Pacific University Institutional Review Board (IRB) describe the day-to-day operations of the IRB, as required by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 45 Part 46 (45 CFR 46), Title 21 Part 56 (21 CFR 56), and Title 21 Part 50 (21 CFR 50). The IRB is constituted for the purpose of ensuring the ethical conduct of research regarding human subjects (or any data or biological materials derived from human subjects) and protecting the rights of such research subjects.

World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki: Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects

The World Medical Association (WMA) has developed the Declaration of Helsinki as a statement of ethical principles for medical research involving human subjects, including research on identifiable human material and data.

The Declaration is intended to be read as a whole and each of its constituent paragraphs should be applied with consideration of all other relevant paragraph