News, Media and Stories | Gender And Sexuality Studies

The poster for Pacific University's production of Orlando. The two letter O's are the symbols for male and female.
Pacific University’s Department of Theatre & Dance presents Virginia Woolf’s satirical romp through the centuries, Orlando, adapted for stage by Sarah Ruhl to run October 17-20 in the Tom Miles Theatre on the Forest Grove Campus.
Martha Rampton
When Dr. Martha Rampton arrived on Pacific’s campus as a history professor in 1994, female professors still were sometimes treated like secretaries, being asked, for example, to fetch coffee for their male colleagues.A year later, Pacific had its first Feminist Studies program.
Prom clipped cards and lights
The Queer Prom, scheduled for May 3, had been canceled due to unforeseen circumstances. Organizers plan to reschedule for the fall.
Tessa Nelson '19
Pacific senior Tessa Nelson '19 is the 2018-19 recipient of the LGBTQ+ Coral Scholarship.
Schultz Lecture stock image
Dr. Jaime Schultz will give the talk at 7 p.m. in the Marsh Hall Taylor Auditorium on the Forest Grove Campus.
Steven Thrasher
Journalist and author Steven W. Thrasher will present “Infectious Blackness: How Racial Fear Drives America from Medicine to Politics” during this free and open to the public lecture on the Forest Grove Campus.
Emily Sernaker MFA '18 talked to Steinem about the #MeToo social media campaign's place in the history of the women's rights movement.
The first woman to graduate from Pacific University was Harriett Hoover Killin in 1869.  At the time Harriet attended Pacific, three years worth of college curriculum were required for women to earn a degree, in comparison to four for men.
This Women's History Month we have been highlighting important Pacific women in our history. This week, we look back to Ladies Hall, later named Herrick Hall, and how it provided more women with the opportunity to attend Pacific. 
During the month of March we have been honoring important Pacific women like Claire Argow, one of the first three women to attain a law degree from Yale Law School in 1930. 

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