News, Media and Stories | Pacific History

Marsh Hall
The Forest Grove Historic Landmarks Board honored Pacific University and the Architectural Resources Group with the Eric G. Stewart award for documenting the historical significance of buildings on the university’s Forest Grove Campus.
Archive photos and letters from the Indian Training School
Back in the late 19th century, when Pacific University was an outpost of higher education in the Pacific Northwest, the school took part in an ignoble American experiment. With Pacific’s support, the Forest Grove Indian Training School brought Native American children to a nearby campus, where they were forced to abandon tribal culture in favor of learning the skills and religion of the dominant white society. Some didn't survive the transition.
Boxer III debuted this fall at Homecoming. The third incarnation of our beloved mascot statue was unveiled as an art piece representing the history, diversity and spirit of Pacific.
Members of the BSU in 1969
Pacific University's Black Student Union was formed in 1967 to give African American students a center of social and political gravity. It later went dormant, but has rebounded again to provide African American students with a sense of community.
McCall Forum
For more than quarter of a century, the Pacific University Tom McCall Forum was a fixture of the Portland political scene.
We took a look back through the archives and found some festive photos of campus during the winter!
Students, faculty and staff at Pacific have come together to celebrate Wassail through a festive gathering nearly every year since the turn of the 20th Century, when principal and dean Mary Frances Farnham held a holiday banquet for students staying on campus during the winter break.
Boxer, a bronze Chinese statue of a dragon-like creature, ruled campus for decades before disappearing.
The founders of the Hillsboro Campus reunited with employees, alumni, students and local dignitaries to celebrate a decade of growth and success.
The first woman to graduate from Pacific University was Harriett Hoover Killin in 1869.  At the time Harriet attended Pacific, three years worth of college curriculum were required for women to earn a degree, in comparison to four for men.

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