New Topics and Travel Class Descriptions

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Travel Classes - Short-term Study Abroad

International Programs has the list of upcoming travel classes (short-term study abroad). 

New Course and Topic Course Descriptions

Summer 2018

GSS-255-01/355-01 | Cross Cultural Perspectives on Sex (4 credits)
This course provides students with a framework for understanding the historical and contemporary investigation and application of cross-cultural perspectives on sex (thus, also, assigned sex, gender, and sexuality). We will interrogate  how sex, the “body”, and sexuality exist as  cultural constructions. We compare how this is different from other theories of social construction. Cultural norms, mores, and other ideologies sanction and regulate human sex and sexuality, and universally exist, but particular form and function varies widely from one culture to another, and even within culture. This course then examines cross cultural perspectives on these  variations of sexual attitude, behavior, and regulation. We  then examine the methodologies and ethics of this type of  research; we build time-limited field-work projects, focusing on participant-observation methods and practices. Finally, we conclude with an academic round- table discussion of our work, and upper-division students present a final draft of their field work project.

PH 355-01 | Men's Health (4 credits)
The focus of this course is on issues affecting the health of men. This course will provide students with opportunities to critically explore a broad array of men’s health concerns including: health disparities faced by men, reproductive health, male anatomy and physiology, masculinity, diseases unique to men, diseases that are more common in men or affect men differently than women, wellness, and mental health. Special emphasis on the importance of social and behavioral factors that influence the determinants, distribution, prevention and health promotion of men in a modern and diverse society. No prerequisites; 100% online via Moodle. 

Fall 2018

ARTST 121-01 | Studio I: Curiosity Museum (4 credits)
In this section of The Creative Process students will make a variety of objects and artworks that might be found in a museum. The class will determine the theme of the museum. Examples include a natural history museum of extinct organisms, an archeological museum of a fictional culture, or a museum of celebrity relics.  Emphasis will be placed on an iterative creative process to develop unique objects and artworks using a variety of media. The resulting works will be exhibited in a “museum”.

ARTST 121-02 | Studio I: Kitchen & Table (2 credits)
An introduction to clay with an emphasis on function in the context of preparing and sharing food. Students will try their hands at making casseroles, ferment crocks, serving dishes, tableware, and more as we work with community members to plan and serve a fundraiser meal to support local hunger organizations. CE credit

ARTST 121-03 | Studio I: Stained Glass (4 credits)
This course is designed to acquaint students with three basic areas in the study and construction of stained glass; history, design concepts, and skills in cutting, soldering, and fitting glass. Basic course materials will be supplied, however students may be required to obtain additional materials necessary to complete their projects.

ARTST 121-04 | Studio I: 3D Modeling & Printing (2 credits)
Studio course exploring three-dimensional (3d) computer modeling. Topics include the creation and manipulation of 3d shapes using modeling software and preparation of output for 3d printing and other computer numeric controlled machinery.

ARTST 121-05 | Studio I: Printmaking (4 credits)
Students will explore the world of printmaking as they learn and apply different brainstorming techniques.  Projects will reinforce the steps of the creative process and that inspire innovation, teamwork, and play. Emphasis will be placed on finding multiple and novel solutions to problems. 

ARTST 355-01 | Gallery Management (4 credits)
In this workshop/seminar class, students will gain hands-on experience with the post-production end of art making. Students will help to manage the permanent collection, plan and install exhibits, develop publicity, and host receptions and artist talks in formal and informal exhibit spaces on campus. Through researching contemporary artists and collecting feedback from stakeholders, students will develop an exhibit schedule to showcase the vibrant contemporary art scene. Students will also visit practicing artists in their studios and check out a variety of exhibit venues in the region.

BIOL 355-01 | ST: Evolution and Biodiversity (4 credits)
Investigation of the evolutionary processes responsible for the origin and diversification of life on Earth. This course covers major concepts in evolutionary biology, including the origin of molecular variation, mechanisms of evolutionary change, patterns of speciation and extinction, and the diversity and evolutionary relationships of living organisms. This course may be substituted for either BIOL 312 or BIOL 313.

BIOL 360-01 | ST: Symbiosis (4 credits)
Description: This course provides an overview of the diversity of mutualistic symbioses and their critical roles in the natural environment.  The associations are presented using an integrative approach, spanning the levels of organization from ecosystems to molecules. Pre-req’s: BIOL 312, BIOL 313 and BIOL 314

BIOL 489-01 | Advanced Research Methods (4 credits)
Topic: Identification and Characterization of Indigenous Yeast from a Local Winery (L. Sardinia)
Crushed grapes harbor a complex community of yeast species responsible for spontaneous alcoholic fermentation. Originally, all wine was made by taking advantage of ambient microbiota for spontaneous fermentation. Various yeasts found on the surface of grape skins and the indigenous microbiota associated with winery surfaces participate in these natural wine fermentations. A local winery, Montinore Estate, employs biodynamic processes as well as the use of ambient yeast. They obtain grapes from three different locations, separated by several miles. For this ARM course, students will isolate yeast from partially fermented grape juice samples from the different locations. The yeast will be characterized in two ways. Yeast DNA will be isolated, amplified through PCR, and a key region of the DNA sequenced. The sequences will then be compared to databases to provide identification of the species (and in some cases, strains) of the yeast present. Additionally, physiological analysis of the yeast isolates will be accomplished through the use of Biolog YT MicroPlates, which contain a variety of organic food sources. Yeast will be characterized based on the types of carbon compounds they assimilate and/or oxidize. Suggested course: Microbiology

BIOL 489-02 | Advanced Research Methods (4 credits)
Topic: Pathophysiology of Disease (D. Scholnick)
Recent changes in global climate have put animals at increasing risk from opportunistic pathogens. Of special concern is that climate disruptions such as variations in temperature, carbon dioxide and oxygen can have profound impacts on the spread of vector-borne disease in northern latitudes. For this Advanced Research Methods course, students will investigate physiological changes associated with disease and injury in the context of how recent environmental disruptions impact the occurrence and pathophysiology of diseases in reptiles and a variety of marine organisms.  Students will conduct experiments to determine how blood pathogens impact normal physiological function in a variety of non-mammalian species. Work will focus on determining how environmental fluctuations that are being driven by anthropomorphic factors such as elevations in carbon dioxide and decreases in oxygen impact the ability of reptiles and marine organisms to fight infections. Work will involve collecting animals from the field, taking blood samples, measuring infection levels and altering environmental conditions in a laboratory setting. Students should be comfortable handling a variety of wild animals including lizards, marine crustaceans and echinoderms.Suggested courses: One of the following – Animal Physiology, Marine Biology

EXMB 255-01 | The Coaching Profession (2 credits)
This course will provide an introduction to the sport coaching profession, including general principles for success. Designed for students interested in coaching at the youth, high school, or collegiate level; emphasis will be placed on understanding professional expectations, preparation/training, and program management.

EDUC 355-01 | Education for Sustainability (2 credits)
Education for Sustainability (EFS) is a transformative process that engages students, teachers, and schools in imagining and building a world where we, and future generations, can live and prosper. The goal is to guide students in developing an understanding of the relationships between the environment, the economy, and society. EFS also provides opportunities to learn skills, perspectives, and values that motivate learners to become active participants in society. This course provides foundational knowledge of the environmental and sustainability education movements that have paved the way for the incorporation of environmental education in our schools. Students will explore the history of the national No Child Left Inside movement and its impact on Oregon education standards. 

ENGL 220-01 | L&HC Crime and Mystery in Film and Literature (4 credits)
This special topics course traces the history of the crime and mystery genres in film and literature from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century.  The syllabus will thus span from Victorian novels, like those of Charles Dickens and Bram Stoker, to contemporary sci-fi novels and films, like Under The Skin and Blade Runner 2049. In between we will also explore the surreal fiction of G.K. Chesterton and the haunting suspense films of Alfred Hitchcock. Throughout the course there will be a thematic emphasis on ghosts and specters as a means of thinking about the past and its refusal to remain past. Crime and mystery will interest us especially for the symbolic and thematic power they hold for authors, directors, and audiences, prodding such questions as the following.  What can crime tell us about justice and ethics?  What can mystery tell us about logic and reason? Why do we like to be scared by a story? What does it mean to be haunted? What can specters, spirits, or ghosts in fiction tell us about the relation of the past to the present or future, or the relation of the dead to the living? Crime and mystery will thus provide an opportunity to learn interpretive approaches to literature and film, including sub-genres such as the metaphysical detective, the film noir, the sci-fi detective story, and the existential thriller. 

MEDA 255-01/355-01 | Event Planning/Marketing (2 credits)
The objective of this course is to host a cultural event on the Pacific University Forest Grove Campus. The event will constitute a Youth Film Festival and other arts programming. You will develop skills in the following areas: curatorial skills, social media outreach, event marketing, event planning. Students will select entries for exhibition, market the event, and plan and host the event on campus in October. Students from all areas interested in the above skill-sets are encouraged to participate.

OL 155-01 | Intro to Expedition Planning (1 credit)
The course will give students the tools to help them plan for the elements of a group expedition in a rugged wilderness area outside of the United States. The focus of this course is developing students' judgment, decision-making, and critical thinking skills so that they can more effectively participate on expeditionary trips. Students will also be exposed to historical approaches to international expeditions through readings and discussion. One of the primary outcomes of this course will be developing a detailed plan through preliminary textual and Internet investigation, begin making contacts in the area of travel, and developing a risk management plan that students will use following the course. Offered alternate years during Fall.

POLS 355-01 | Race & U.S. Politics (4 credits)
The course will have two parts. It will begin with a historical, legal, and political history of race and its centrality to the development of American politics from the framing of the U.S. Constitution to the inauguration of the modern two-party system after the Second Reconstruction. The course will then explore the role of race in contemporary American politics. The course will examine the voting behaviors, civic participation patterns, and public policy views of Asian, Black, Latino, and White Americans

SOC 150-01 | Understanding and Resisting Inequality (4 credits)
This course introduces students to the foundational concepts, theories, and research in sociology through an in-depth and critical analysis of social inequality, or stratification, in U.S. society. Students will gain a general understanding of how sociologists think and ask questions about the world, with an emphasis on understanding the historical and theoretical perspectives that sociologists use to understand different forms of inequality. By engaging with several readings and films, students will analyze the institutions and mechanisms that sociologists argue are responsible for creating, reproducing, and changing the structure of inequality, with a primary focus on social class, gender, and race/ethnicity.

Winter 2019

ARTST-121-01 | Studio I: Textile Printing (2 credits)
Create your own textile designs using a variety of printing techniques (screenprint, linoleum, and vinyl erasers). Create patterns on paper and fabric by hand and with the press. Collaborate with others to create large scale patterns on fabric. Take home your printed textiles to use as functional items.

ARTST-121-02 | Studio I: The Creative Process (2 credits)
Studio I courses engage students with the creative process. Emphasis will be placed on problem-solving in relation to the theme and media of the course. Paint, print, photo, ceramics, glass, metal, and other media are explored in different sections of this course.

HIST 255-01 | Debating the U.S. Constitution (2 credits)
This is a role-playing class about the most important legal event in American history: the Constitutional Convention of 1787. You will be assigned a character, either as one of the Founding Fathers or as a member of a state delegation. Your job is to create the Articles of Confederation that will set in place the governing framework for the new United States of America. Students will debate the Virginia Plan, the New Jersey Plan, and the Great Compromise. You will consider whether America should be a large or a small republic, states' rights versus federal power, whether slavery should be allowed, and what a Bill of Rights should include, among other important issues. Reenacting the past is one of the most enjoyable ways to learn about history!

OL 255-01 | International Expedition (2 credits)
This course prepares students to be better global citizens by exposing them to cultural, environmental and social justice issues while experiencing an outdoor adventure trip in an international setting. Students develop judgment, decision-making, and critical thinking skills so that they can more effectively plan and execute expeditionary trips on their own in the future. During the travel course, students will participate on a week-long wilderness expedition. Throughout this course students will experience growth by opening themselves to new ways of thinking and seeing the world. Offered alternate years during Winter. Prerequisite: OL-155.

SOC 355-01 | Mental Illness and Society (2 credits)
The course will cover material that demonstrates the difference between the “Sociology” of mental illnesses and the “Psychology” of these phenomena. This distinction may be characterized by sociology’s implicit critique of historical and contemporary psychiatric discourses and practices. Mental illnesses, in this regard, will be discussed as largely “socially-constructed” phenomena. This is not to say that this perspective will ignore or discount the validity of being mentally ill, but will instead focus on the social implications of mental health, including how third parties influence mental illness symptoms, how “odd” behavior can be construed as indicative of mental illness, how medications affect self-perceptions, and finally, how psychiatric diagnostic categories are intertwined with trends in the greater culture.

Spring 2019

ARTST-121-02 | Studio I: Stained Glass (4 credits)
This course is designed to acquaint students with three basic areas in the study and construction of stained glass; history, design concepts, and skills in cutting, soldering, and fitting glass. Basic course materials will be supplied, however students may be required to obtain additional materials necessary to complete their projects.

ARTST-121-03 | Studio I: The Artist Book (4 credits)
Students will explore the possibilities offered by the artist’s book for the presentation of visual information and ideas. A broad range of book binding methods will be introduced and applied along with an exploration of paper and printmaking techniques that can expand the creative expressivity of this genre.

ARTST-221-01 | Studio II: Painting Pacific (4 credits)
In this section students will use various painting and drawing techniques to explore themes related to the Pacific Ocean. This open ended topic will allow students to explore areas of personal interest such as tsunami, ring of fire, Asian/American relationships, sea life, timber industry, shipping, transpacific cable communication, etc.

ARTST-221-02 | Studio II: Ceramics Throwing (4 credits)
Students will explore a variety of ceramics techniques with a focus on the wheel. Students will also have the opportunity to explore the use of modeling software to create ceramic works on a 3D clay printer.

ARTST-222-01 | Studio II: Interdisciplinary Design (4 credits)
This course provides an opportunity to work on a real-world design problem, which is determined by a steering group comprised of faculty, students, administrators, and staff and will typically consider sustainability in relation to the built environment, product development, landscape design, or community development.

ARTST 355-01 | Gallery Management (4 credits)
In this workshop/seminar class, students will gain hands-on experience with the post-production end of art making. Students will help to manage the permanent collection, plan and install exhibits, develop publicity, and host receptions and artist talks in formal and informal exhibit spaces on campus. Through researching contemporary artists and collecting feedback from stakeholders, students will develop an exhibit schedule to showcase the vibrant contemporary art scene. Students will also visit practicing artists in their studios and check out a variety of exhibit venues in the region.

CJLS 355-01 | Juvenile Justice and Delinquency (4 credits)
This course explores juvenile delinquency in relation to the general problem of crime; analysis of factors underlying juvenile delinquency including race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, disability, and immigration status; treatment and prevention; organization and social responsibility of law enforcement; and community-based alternatives. Additional topics include the historical development of the concept of delinquency, the special status of juveniles before the law, juvenile justice procedural law, the structure and operations of the major components of juvenile justice systems, international juvenile justice practices, and contemporary reform efforts in juvenile justice.

POLS 255 | Democracy: Virtues, Vices, Alternatives (4 credits)
This course surveys theoretical defenses of representative democracy but also theoretical critiques of democracy (especially modern liberal constitutional democracy as it has developed in the industrialized world). In addition to this sort of survey, the course explores alternative visions of democracy: participatory democracy, deliberative democracy, populist democracy, and socialist/anarchist visions of democracy. Finally it examines historical and contemporary defenses of alternatives to democracy: philosopher kings, hereditary monarchy, technocratic meritocracy, fascism, communism.

POLS 355 | Law & Social Change (4 credits)
This course will focus on the relationship between law, politics, and society, with a particular focus on the role of the courts, interest groups, and social movements in fostering social change--and whether the law can change society at all. The course will primarily center around the strategies that groups and movements use to achieve their goals, but will focus particularly on their legal strategies. The course will also grapple with the unique opportunities and challenges involved with using the legal system to change society.

SCI 255 | Science & History of Information: Travel Prep Course  (2 credits)
This course is required in order to enroll in Science & History of Information: Travel, but it can also be taken on its own. The course explores the historical development of the modern scientific concept of information. Basic physical and technological principles of information encoding and transmission will be introduced both theoretically and in the laboratory. The primary emphasis of the course is not on mathematical problem solving but on encouraging students to understand and appreciate the role of information in science and society.

 

Past Term Course Descriptions

Spring 2018

Winter 2018

Fall 2017

Spring 2017

Winter 2017