COVID-19 Information

Many Winter 2021 courses will be held online. Please refer to the BoxerOnline class schedule for details.

New Topics and Travel Class Descriptions

We are currently in the process of gathering Winter 2021 and Spring 2021 course descriptions from the faculty who are teaching these courses. If you can't find the course description you're looking for, you can email the professor of the course.

New Course and Special Topics Course Descriptions

Winter 2021

ARTST-121-01 The Creative Process (2 credits)
Studio I courses engage students with the creative process. Emphasis will be placed on problem-solving in relation to the theme and media of the course. Paint, print, photo, ceramics, glass, metal, and other media are explored in different sections of this course. Meets Core Requirement: Artistic Practice & Creative Process 

ARTST-121-03 Studio I: Pinhole Camera Meets Digital (2 credits)
Introduction to pinhole cameras, their construction and use. Process different kinds of negatives through conventional and digital means. Critical analysis of process, composition and content is emphasized. Meets Core Requirement: Artistic Practice & Creative Process  

ARTST-121-04 Studio I: Rocket Stove Cooking (2 credits)
Let’s build homemade cook stoves and make a meal.  Using the clean and efficient burning J-tube rocket stove principle, small teams will design and test combustion cores and pan supports to arrive at a final solution. Materials used will be clay, sand, straw, metal, and mineral insulation. Efficient wood fired stoves enable cooking without fossil fuels and reduce the amount of biomass needed. Useful for emergency preparedness, campouts, and even daily use. Meets Core Requirement: Artistic Practice & Creative Process 

ARTST-221-01 Studio I: Chains and Clasps (2 credits)
In this course you’ll learn about a variety of chain techniques, including braided and knitted wire, soldered and unsoldered links, rope chains and chain mail. From delicate detailed designs to bold and chunky, you’ll also be learning to design and fabricate your own unique clasps and closures. Meets Core Requirement: Artistic Practice & Creative Process 

CIV 155: WTF 2020: Reflection, Action, and Change (2 credits) 
What is The Future? This course will take the WTF you might have been thinking about 2020 and help you envision and enact how we can move forward together as sustainable communities in the years ahead. After a year that will go down in history and individual memories as packed with challenging problems--a global pandemic, racial tension, economic downturn, devastating fires, and election year drama unlike any seen in recent decades, students will have an opportunity to learn about and reflect on the events of 2020, discuss them with other students and community members, envision the communities they want for the future, and take action to proactively shape how that future unfolds. Fulfills both Civic Engagement and Sustainability Core requirements. 

DS-355: Health and Disability Advocacy (2 credits)
Advocacy strategies are important tools for change. Advocacy in health and disability fields include a broad array of approaches, including self-advocacy, advocating for the rights of individuals within systems (e.g., healthcare and disability rights advocates), grassroots advocacy and direct action campaigns, media advocacy, and political / legislative advocacy. This course will overview various advocacy approaches applied to case studies in the disability and public health arenas. Students will conduct research on advocacy issues of interest to local communities and learn from local stakeholders to develop an advocacy strategy, develop advocacy messages, and take advocacy action.  Meets Core Requirement: Civic Engagement

ECON 255-01/355-01: Intro to Environmental Economics: Fieldwork
Environmental economics: fieldwork is a 2-credit winter course and will consist of visits to pollutive commercial and industrial sites and affected natural areas in the Portland Metropolitan Area for interactive sessions with government regulators, representatives from environmental NGOs, and compliance officers at regulated businesses. These sessions will provide insight into the practical issues related to the theory and policy studied in the fall ECON/ENV 355 Env Econ: Theory companion course. Prerequisite: ECON/ENV 355 Environmental Economics: Theory.  Meets Core Requirement: Sustainability

HIST 255: Revolutionary Paris 1791
What was it like to participate in the French Revolution? In this class you will take part in a historical role-playing exercise, complete with gamebook, speeches, and other activities. Each student will be assigned a character and will speak, write, strategize, and scheme as a way to understand the past. Students will engage with the predominant intellectual, political, and ideological currents of revolutionary Paris in the summer of 1791 as the National Assembly struggled to write a constitution amidst growing internal conflict and the threat of foreign invasion. Meets Core Requirement: Historical Context

HUM-155-01 ST: Global Explorations: Bali 
It is crucial in these challenging times that we maintain contact with one another globally.  This course--Art and Religion in Bali--offers students an experiential and meaningful encounter with Bali in a manner adapted to a virtual environment.  The course includes guest lectures, site visits, cultural content, language learning, and peer-to-peer fieldwork with Balinese college-age co-researchers.  Students will also have the opportunity to interview local artists and guest lecturers as tailored to their individual fieldwork projects. Excursions, adapted to a virtual environment, may include site visits sacred architecture of Bali, meetings with Balinese traditional and contemporary artists, and workshops with traditional Gamelan musicians and dancers. Students will be offered introductory language courses in Indonesian.  They will have the opportunity to participate in cultural activities that may include a Balinese cooking class, batik or other textile arts demonstrations, and Balinese shadow puppeteering.

PH-355: Health and Disability Advocacy (2 credits)
Advocacy strategies are important tools for change. Advocacy in health and disability fields include a broad array of approaches, including self-advocacy, advocating for the rights of individuals within systems (e.g., healthcare and disability rights advocates), grassroots advocacy and direct action campaigns, media advocacy, and political / legislative advocacy. This course will overview various advocacy approaches applied to case studies in the disability and public health arenas. Students will conduct research on advocacy issues of interest to local communities and learn from local stakeholders to develop an advocacy strategy, develop advocacy messages, and take advocacy action.  Meets Core Requirement: Civic Engagement

SCI-155-01 ST: Global Explorations: England (2 credits)
A Global Explorations travel course is a required short-term travel course for students enrolled in the Global Scholars Program. Each year the global destination and disciplinary or interdisciplinary focus will change depending on the instructors. Examples may include Race & Ethnicity in the Philippines, History and Politics in Renaissance Italy, or Visiting England Through the Lens of Information. Prerequisite: Instructor Consent.  Recommended completion of HUM 100 Visiting England Through the Lens of Information or SCI 255 Science & History of Information: Prep.

Spring 2021

ARTHI-282-01 Topics in Italian Renaissance Art
This introductory course surveys the major developments in 15th – 16th c. Italian Renaissance painting, sculpture, and architecture as distinct pursuits, but also as related endeavors. In a contextual analysis, students explore the meanings and functions of art and architecture, focusing on the historical, religious, political, cultural, intellectual, and socio-economic contexts that shaped these works.  Emphasis is placed on the revival of Humanism and classical ideologies and their implications on the visual arts as well as the patronage by individuals and city-states to construct or challenge power relations. In this framework, students also learn methods and vocabulary of art analysis and interpretation while expanding their knowledge on other topics such as function, iconography, stylistic innovations by major artists and architects, class, gender, commercialization, and making and materials. Fulfills Analyzing & Interpreting Texts Core Requirement.

ARTST-121-01 Studio I: Darkroom Photography (4 credits)
The class highlights the world of film as it is today. Students will use their own film cameras of any format and vintage to explore all types of film technology - from classic Black/White/Color films that are still available to the latest retro film types recently produced. Film technology is still relevant as a medium in the commercial as well as the artistic - world. New digital equipment production and techniques are still being developed that are based on this medium. Meets Core Requirement: Artistic Practice & Creative Process 

ARTST-121-02 Studio I: Botanical Illustration (2 credits)
Artists across cultures and times have drawn and painted flowers and plants for a wide range of purposes, ranging from the decorative to the scientific. Students will use a variety of drawing materials and techniques to create original botanical artworks and illustrations. This course will emphasize creative problem solving through research, experimentation and play. Counts towards Core Requirement: Artistic Practice & Creative Process 

ARTST-221-01 Studio II: Printmaking (4 credits)
Students will develop their skills in printmaking through historical and contemporary context. Students will be encouraged to think about socially engaged art while diving into relief and screen printing processes. Printmaking was first invented to disseminate information has the power to create change and facilitate meaningful discourse. Printmaking is embraced by artists because of its accessibility to the public, but also for the opportunities it offers for innovation and experimentation. Much of our focus will be on traditional techniques, the knowledge that comes from this meant to inspire experimentation and facilitate execution of the students’ conceptual ideas. We will cover relief and screen printing processes. We will work collaboratively on a project that focuses on social engagement in our communities. Meets Core Requirement: Artistic Practice & Creative Process 

ARTST-221-02 Studio II: Ceramics Throwing (4 credits)
Students will explore a variety of ceramics techniques with a focus on the wheel. Students will also have the opportunity to explore the use of modeling software to create ceramic works on a 3D clay printer. Basic course materials will be supplied, however students may be required to obtain additional materials necessary to complete their projects. Meets Core Requirement: Artistic Practice & Creative Process 

ARTST-221-03 Studio II: Location Photography (2 credits)
Planning and logistics of shooting on location. Transportation, scouting, permits and billing, in addition to lighting, metering and other photographic controls. Subjects include fashion, portraiture, product, and architectural photography. Students will participate in on-location photo shoots of various subjects, using techniques and equipment specific to each scenario. Students will be responsible for creating multi location shoots individually, and will participate in the creation of a collaborative shoot with a group of fellow students. Meets Core Requirement: Artistic Practice & Creative Process 

ARTST-221-04 Studio II: Metals (4 credits)
In this course you will design and fabricate models from carved wax, found objects, and the 3D printer.  You’ll learn how to make a mold of your model, and how to pour molten metal into the mold in order to create jewelry and small sculpture of your own design. Meets Core Requirement: Artistic Practice & Creative Process 

BA-355-01: NT: Diversity in Organizations (4 credits)
This course examines the implications of employee diversity in organizations, an issue of increasing importance. It includes study of the changing demographics of workers, including multiple demographic groups and areas of difference important to organizational treatment and outcomes. This course examines research on treatment, access, and customer discrimination. Legislation related to diversity is also reviewed. This course also provides suggestions for individuals and organizations to increase opportunities and outcomes for workers of all backgrounds. Meets Core Requirement: Diverse Perspectives. Pre-requisite: Junior standing (60 credits earned)

ECON-255-01/PH 255-01: NT: Health Economics (4 credits)
Students in the health economics course will apply economic theory and empirical analysis to study how socioeconomic status, public policy actions, and individual decisions influence health outcomes. The economics of private insurance markets comprises another important area of study in the course. The functions and outcomes in the United States health care system will be studied in detail and compared with those in other nations. Also listed as DH 255 and PH 255. Meets Core Requirement: Social Systems & Human Behavior

ECON-255-03: NT: Behavior Economics Financial Literacy (4 credits)
Traditional economic theory assumes that individuals are rational when making financial decisions; rational in a sense that they use the best information available to them and learn from past experiences. There is however ample empirical evidence that demonstrates individuals routinely make important financial decisions that are clearly not rational, often with costly financial consequences. This course introduces students to behavioral models of decision making used in psychology and behavioral economics where individuals are not assumed to behave rationally. In these models, individuals are predisposed to making costly mistakes in their financial decisions due to the existence of cognitive biases. Students will develop an understanding of the theory behind these cognitive biases, and the different ways these biases can lead to poor financial decisions.  Students will also develop strategies to prevent cognitive biases from entering into financial decision-making processes in order to make more informed choices concerning education, savings, consumer purchases, borrowing, & insurance. No prerequisistes. Meets Core Requirement: Quantitative Reasoning

HIST-255/355: Italian Renaissance (2 credits)
This colloquium will consider the history of the Italian Renaissance. This course presents an overview of the political, social, and cultural history of Italy from roughly 1300 to 1600. Its aim is to provide students with a basic understanding of the forces and processes that shaped the states and the societies of the Italian peninsula in an era of extraordinary changes: from the developments of urban civilization and the rise of humanism in the fourteenth and early fifteenth century, to political and religious crisis, and art, architecture, and science in the early seventeenth century. A 2.0 credit readings course will be discussion based, so preparation and engagement are essential. Meets Core Requirement: Historical Context

HIST-355: Environment & the City in Japan (4 credits)
This course reviews Japanese history from the perspective of the city and natural environments to explore the interrelationship of humans and their natural surroundings over time. Major themes: What political and economic forces shaped the development of the city and ideas about nature? What can the selection of architectural designs and building materials reveal about national identity and cultural influences? What role did individual sites and buildings play in the historical development of the Japanese nation-state and culture? How did ideas about the city and natural world change over time? Meets Core Requirement: International Diverse Perspectives, Sustainability, Historical Context

HIST-455: Race, Science, Empire (4 credits)
Our concern is not with the memorization of facts, but with the wielding of concepts in a way that allows us to evaluate a book in the context of a broader historical field that leads us to think more deeply about a critical set of social and cultural phenomena over time.  The relationship between instructor and student is inherently different in this process; each of us will try to come to an understanding about the profound phenomenon of 19th century imperial exploration through the lens of the production of knowledge around race. Fulfills Core Requirement: Social Systems & Human Behavior. 

PH-255-01/ECON-255-01: NT: Health Economics (4 credits)
Students in the health economics course will apply economic theory and empirical analysis to study how socioeconomic status, public policy actions, and individual decisions influence health outcomes. The economics of private insurance markets comprises another important area of study in the course. The functions and outcomes in the United States health care system will be studied in detail and compared with those in other nations. Also listed as DH 255 and PH 255. Meets Core Requirement: Social Systems & Human Behavior

PHIL-255-01 NT: Nepal Philosophy and Religion (2 credits)
This is a travel course to Nepal in which students will engage with the contemporary Tibetan and Nepali legacies of Hindu  and Buddhist philosophy and religion.  On successful completion of the course, students will be able to relate the understanding of Hinduism and Buddhism that they acquired in the pre-travel course to the Nepali context.  Instructor consent required to enroll. Please contact Katharine Loevy via email at loev1787@pacificu.edu.  Fulfills core requirements: International and Diverse Perspectives and Historical Context

SCI-255-01 Science & History of Information: Travel (2 credits)
Are you interested in traveling to England to have fun, explore, and learn about the science and history of information? Dr. James Butler (physics) and Dr. Shereen Khoja (computer science) will be leading a travel course to do just that. Information is at the core of human languages, how we transmit and encode messages, computer algorithms, internet searches, and even modern models of the universe itself. In England, students will visit interesting places, see artifacts, and learn from people central to the development of our modern understanding of information—from Stonehenge to Oxford University to Bletchley Park. The travel course will take place at the end of Spring 2021. Please review the course website and contact Dr. Butler (jjbutler@pacificu.edu) or Dr. Khoja (shereen@pacificu.edu) if you have any questions. Prerequisite: SCI 255 Science & History of Information: Prep or Instructor Consent. Fulfills International & Diverse Perspectives Core Requirement. 

Travel Classes - Short-term Study Abroad

International Programs has the list of upcoming travel classes (short-term study abroad). 

Past Term Course Descriptions

Fall 2020

Spring 2020

Winter 2020

Fall 2019

Spring 2019

Winter 2019

Fall 2018

Summer 2018

Spring 2018

Winter 2018

Fall 2017

Spring 2017

Winter 2017

 

 

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